Tourism in Southeast Asia

Challenges and New Directions

edited by Michael Hitchcock, Victor T. King & Michael Parnwell

  • Published:
  • Pages: 368 pp.
Available from NIAS Press worldwide except North America

This timely and up-to-date exploration of the state of tourism development in the region examines the challenges facing Southeast Asian tourism at a critical time. A key resource for tourism research and education.

Tourism in Southeast Asia provides an up-to-date exploration of the state of tourism development and associated issues in one of the world’s most dynamic tourism destinations.

The volume takes a close look at many of the challenges facing Southeast Asian tourism at a critical stage of transition and transformation, and following a recent series of crises and disasters. Building on and advancing the path-breaking Tourism in South-East Asia, produced by the same editors in 1993, it adopts a multidisciplinary approach and includes contributions from some of the leading researchers on tourism in Southeast Asia, presenting a number of fresh perspectives.

The volume combines introductory material with an in-depth examination of anthropological writing on Southeast Asian tourism followed by case studies dealing with as diverse issues as globalization, terrorism, ‘romance tourism’ and ecotourism. A sister volume, Heritage Tourism in Southeast Asia, is in preparation.

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Michael Hitchcock is Academic Director and Dean of Faculty at the IMI University Centre, Luzern in Switzerland. Until recently, he was Deputy Dean for Research and External Relations at the University of Chichester. Previously, he founded and was Director of the International Institute for Culture, Tourism and Development at London Metropolitan University.

Michael Hitchcock is Academic Director and Dean of Faculty at the IMI University Centre, Luzern in Switzerland. Until recently, he was Deputy Dean for Research and External Relations at the University of Chichester. Previously, he founded and was Director of the International Institute for Culture, Tourism and Development at London Metropolitan University. Professor Hitchcock has long been involved in tourism studies and is a prolific writer on tourism, heritage and culture in Southeast Asia.

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by Merry White, Boston University
From journal:
Asian Ethnology, Vol. 69, No. 2, 2010

"What has been missing is a work tying political, historical, and economic perspectives on tourism and travel, and work focused on a single region of the world.  This book supplies both, and is a welcome addition to the field of travel studies.

"What has been missing is a work tying political, historical, and economic perspectives on tourism and travel, and work focused on a single region of the world.  This book supplies both, and is a welcome addition to the field of travel studies.

…the volume offers sober renderings of gender in travel, and most importantly, multiple lenses through which to view the experiences one might have away from home."

by T.C. Chang, National University of Singapore
From journal:
Pacific Affairs, vol. 83, no. 3, September 2010

…the book provides an ample overview of emerging trends and challenges in tourism, along with fascinating case studies not encountered elsewhere.  It is a book that undergraduates, tourism teachers and policy makers will find much to consider and discuss.

…the book provides an ample overview of emerging trends and challenges in tourism, along with fascinating case studies not encountered elsewhere.  It is a book that undergraduates, tourism teachers and policy makers will find much to consider and discuss.

by Nicholas Newman
From journal:
Oxford Prospect, 9 June 2009

This interesting book reveals both the light and dark sides of the development of South-East Asia’s tourism industry, written by some of the world’s leading experts on the topic.

The authors’ insights make for fascinating reading, both for a student of tourism, but also for any potential investor new to the region.

This interesting book reveals both the light and dark sides of the development of South-East Asia’s tourism industry, written by some of the world’s leading experts on the topic.

The authors’ insights make for fascinating reading, both for a student of tourism, but also for any potential investor new to the region.

by Geoffrey Wall, University of Waterloo, Canada
From journal:
ASEASUK News 46, 2009

 Unlike many edited books that have a cursory introduction and conclusion, the editors have made substantial contributions to this book, not only in some cases by writing individual chapters but, particularly, by providing chapters that introduce concepts, synthesise the literature, and provide a context in which country‐wide and more local case studies can be placed.

 Unlike many edited books that have a cursory introduction and conclusion, the editors have made substantial contributions to this book, not only in some cases by writing individual chapters but, particularly, by providing chapters that introduce concepts, synthesise the literature, and provide a context in which country‐wide and more local case studies can be placed. Indeed, several of these chapters are worthy of attention by readers whose interests lie primarily in tourism in other regions. The references for each chapter are gathered into one bibliography at the end of the book and this is a helpful resource for, as I read the book, I came across seemingly valuable sources that I had overlooked or had not even been aware of previously. There is also an index that combines both places and concepts. The book is nicely produced, well edited and reasonably priced, at least in the paper version. The content is sound and the presentations are generally free of unnecessary jargon. While the focus is on Southeast Asia, tourism is global phenomenon with far‐reaching implications for this region as well as for the world as a whole. As such, the work merits the attention of regional specialists, tourism scholars, and all those interested in cultural change and community well‐being, regardless of discipline.

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