Burma/Myanmar – Where Now?

Edited by Mikael Gravers and Flemming Ytzen

  • Published:
  • Pages: 462 pp., maps and illustrations
  • Series number: 3
Worldwide
  • Considers where the recent changes in Burma may be leading.
  • Provides essential background information and the relevant names and references.
  • Offers focused analysis by scholars and journalists on key issues.

Recent changes in Burma/Myanmar have been called the ‘Burmese democratic spring’. While the international media have mainly focused on the economic opportunities offered by these changes and on the doings and sayings of Aung San Suu Kyi, the reality is far more complex. The country is desperately poor, divided by ethnic and religious rivalries and continues to suffer from some of the world’s most intractable military conflicts while powerful elite factions oppose reform.

Where, then, is the country heading? What are the key challenges it will face? Who are likely to be the key players in the unfolding events? What implications are there for international actors in arenas like policy, diplomacy, development and business? With contributions on topics like the political situation, international relations, ethnic and religious rivalries, and the economy, long-time observers of the situation offer insights and analysis that address these issues. The result is a tightly focused volume that will appeal to a broad readership interested in the current situation and its implications.

author image not supplied

 Since 1970-1972 he has conducted ethnographic fieldwork among the Karen ethnic group in Thailand (and Burma). The first fieldwork in Uthaithani and Kanchanaburi provinces was among the Buddhist Pwo Karen (Ga Ploung) and he speaks a proficient Pwo.

 Since 1970-1972 he has conducted ethnographic fieldwork among the Karen ethnic group in Thailand (and Burma). The first fieldwork in Uthaithani and Kanchanaburi provinces was among the Buddhist Pwo Karen (Ga Ploung) and he speaks a proficient Pwo. He has visited this area numerous times and since 1999 also conducted fieldwork among Christian and Buddhist Sgaw (Pgha G’Nyau) and Pwo in Chiang Mai and Lamphun provinces as well as among Karen refugees from Burma. His work on Burma is mainly based on archival research in the Oriental & India Office Collections, The British Library and Public Record Office, Kew in London. He has met with ethnic leaders from the Karen National Union and other ethnic organizations.

From 1999 to 2001 Mikael Gravers was the director of the anthropological part of the interdisciplinary Thai-Danish environmental research project Forest & People in Thailand.He has published on subjects such as ethnicity, nationalism; religion and politics; notions of nature and environment in Burma and Thailand.

Mikael Gravers has been a Nordic and European scholar in NIAS and received a grant from HRH Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark’s Fund. Danish media often request his analysis of events in Burma and Thailand.

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by Min Zin, University of California
From journal:
Contemporary Southeast Asia, Vol. 37 No. 2 (2015)

"(…) visually stunning images (…)

(…) useful overviews of crucial issues.

(…) this volume provides an informative overview of key issues that Myanmar has faced in its modern history (…)"

"(…) visually stunning images (…)

(…) useful overviews of crucial issues.

(…) this volume provides an informative overview of key issues that Myanmar has faced in its modern history (…)"

by Robert. H. Taylor, School of Oriental and African Studies
From journal:
ASEASUK Newsletter, No. 57, Spring 2015

"This timely volume, nicely illustrated and with useful bibliographies attached to many of the entries, is the product of contributions by twenty-one different authors.

"This timely volume, nicely illustrated and with useful bibliographies attached to many of the entries, is the product of contributions by twenty-one different authors.

(…) the volume has its uses, particularly for those for whom it is apparently intended – those going to Myanmar to join the cavalcade of aid and development workers funded by Western governments, international financial institutions, and international non-governmental organisations."

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