Asian Cities

Globalization, Urbanization and Nation-Building

Malcolm McKinnon

  • Published: 2011
  • Pages: 288 pp.
  • illustrated
  • Series: NIAS Monographs
  • Series number: 120
Available from NIAS Press Worldwide
ISBN Hardback: 9788776940782, £50.00
ISBN Paperback: 9788776940799, £17.99

 

  • Questions the centrality of globalization in explaining change in Asian cities and examines developing Asian cities in their own terms rather than as variants of Western urbanization.
  • Explores middle cities ‘off the radar’ as well as well-known metropolises.
  • Uses both quantitative and ethnographic research.

 

Asian Cities challenges Western paradigms of urban growth with a fresh and stimulating look at cities in developing Asia. It questions the status accorded globalization in explaining contemporary Asian cities, arguing instead that they are being transformed by three major forces – urbanization and nation-building as well as globalization. The latter two are not dependent variables of globalization, although all, in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, are shaped by capitalism.

The book reaches beyond the usual focus on metropolitan centres to examine urban life in a sample of middle-sized cities representative of hundreds of such urban centres throughout the Asian continent. An introductory chapter outlines the arguments and introduces the sample cities. Chapters two and three explore two principal facets of urbanization: the material transformation that comes in its train and the impact that it has on the lives of the newly-urbanized. Chapters four to seven explore the way that the national framework shapes cities – including business enterprises, migrantion, travel and commercial popular culture. In a final chapter the book surveys likely trends in Asian cities over the next quarter century and considers the implications of the study for our understanding of globalization generally.

This is a nuanced study grounded in quantitatively-based findings but enriched by qualitative research that both provides additional evidence and brings the findings alive.

author image not supplied

Malcolm McKinnon is an independent New Zealand historian who, besides researching urban development in Asia, has written extensively on New Zealand’s relations with Asia.

Malcolm McKinnon is an independent New Zealand historian who, besides researching urban development in Asia, has written extensively on New Zealand’s relations with Asia.

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by Jørgen Mikkelsen
From journal:
Byerne, Blog om Urban Historie og Kultur

" ‘Asian Cities’ is well-organised and well-argued … with an agreeable variation between theory and empirical data. There are lots of references to books, journal articles, newspapers and websites.

" ‘Asian Cities’ is well-organised and well-argued … with an agreeable variation between theory and empirical data. There are lots of references to books, journal articles, newspapers and websites. But there has also been room given to describe personal experiences in the selected cities – for example, on the level of service at Chinese hotels and about chock-full Indonesian trains – and the book also contains a lot of quotes from people McKinnon has interviewed during his travels.

All in all, it may serve as a good and relatively easy-to-read introduction to the current urban development in some of the world’s largest and most important countries…" (translated from Danish)

by Sin Yee Koh
From journal:
International Institute for Asian Studies, The Newsletter No. 67, Spring 2014

"The book gives prominent space to ethnographic accounts and detailed descriptions of urban phenomena in the respective chosen cities… There is no doubt that McKinnon’s message is important: cities in ‘developing Asia’ have divergent urban experiences ‘on the ground’ (p. 69), which urban theories developed from the Western experience cannot quite capture and explain."

"The book gives prominent space to ethnographic accounts and detailed descriptions of urban phenomena in the respective chosen cities… There is no doubt that McKinnon’s message is important: cities in ‘developing Asia’ have divergent urban experiences ‘on the ground’ (p. 69), which urban theories developed from the Western experience cannot quite capture and explain."

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