After the Great East Japan Earthquake

Political and Policy Change in Post-Fukushima Japan

Edited by Dominic Al-Badri and Gijs Berends

  • Published: 2013
  • Pages: 210 pp., maps and illustrations
  • Series: Asia Insights
  • Series number: 5
Available from NIAS Press worldwide
ISBN Hardback: 978 87 7694 114 7, £65
ISBN Paperback: 978 87 7694 115 4, £22.50
  • Concise study of the effects on key domestic policy areas. 
  • Focus on politics, economics, energy, climate, agriculture and food safety. 
  • Written by experts in their respective policy fields.

The triple disaster that struck Japan in March 2011 began with the most powerful earthquake known to have hit Japan and led to tsunami up to 40 meters in height that devastated a wide area and caused thousands of deaths. The ensuing accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant was Japan’s worst and only second to Chernobyl in its severity.

 

But has this triple disaster also changed Japan? Has it led to a transformation of the country, a shift in how Japan functions? This book, with fresh perspectives on extraordinary events written by diplomats and policy experts at European embassies to Japan, explores subsequent shifts in Japanese politics and policy-making to see if profound changes have occurred or if instead these are limited.

 

The book addresses those policy areas most likely to be affected by the tragedy – politics, economics, energy, climate, agriculture and food safety – describes how the sector has been affected and considers what the implications are for the future.

Dominic Al-Badri is a political analyst at the Delegation of the European Union to Japan. Prior to joining the EU in 2006 he worked as a Japan-based journalist covering politics, social issues, technology, travel and lifestyle.

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by Caroline Brassard, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, nus
From journal:
Asian Journal of Social Science 43 (2015) 837–856

“The book is well structured, has a logical flow and covers a broad range of policies, ranging from fiscal policy, energy policy, climate policy, to agricultural policy and food safety policy. Their insights as policy and political analysts complement well the academic literature on this subject. (…)

“The book is well structured, has a logical flow and covers a broad range of policies, ranging from fiscal policy, energy policy, climate policy, to agricultural policy and food safety policy. Their insights as policy and political analysts complement well the academic literature on this subject. (…)

Generally written in a very accessible style, the “stand-alone” chapters avoid relying on technical terminologies and do not require prior knowledge of Japanese politics and society.

(…) this edited volume is a good contribution to our understanding of contemporary policy making in Japan, in addition to the impact of the triple disaster but will soon be outdated, and is worth reading within the next few years.”

by Jeff Kingston, Temple University Japan
From journal:
Journal of Japanese Studies, 40:2 (2014)

"There is a burgeoning literature on 3.11 Japan from a range of scholarly disciplines, but here we encounter Japan-based diplomats’ perspectives…Overall, this is a useful collection by keen first-hand observers of the scene."

"There is a burgeoning literature on 3.11 Japan from a range of scholarly disciplines, but here we encounter Japan-based diplomats’ perspectives…Overall, this is a useful collection by keen first-hand observers of the scene."

by Anthony Fensom
From journal:
Japan Times, 22 February 2014

"Readers seeking a more in-depth appraisal would best consider […] works written post-Fukushima, such as "After the Great East Japan Earthquake" edited by Dominic Al-Badri and Gijs Berends."

"Readers seeking a more in-depth appraisal would best consider […] works written post-Fukushima, such as "After the Great East Japan Earthquake" edited by Dominic Al-Badri and Gijs Berends."

by S. Hobbis
From journal:
Asian Affairs, vol. 45, no. 1, 2014

“Belong[s] on anyone’s bookshelf who hopes to better understand political and policy changes after, and in response to, Japan’s Triple Disaster.”

“Belong[s] on anyone’s bookshelf who hopes to better understand political and policy changes after, and in response to, Japan’s Triple Disaster.”

by Keith Jackson, SOAS, University of London (UK), Kobe University (Japan)
From journal:
Asia Pacific Business Review, 2014

"…deserve[s] a wider readership.

…Overall, this is an affordable, accessible and worthy book on a deeply resonating topic. The narrative development from chapter to chapter is engaging."

"…deserve[s] a wider readership.

…Overall, this is an affordable, accessible and worthy book on a deeply resonating topic. The narrative development from chapter to chapter is engaging."

by M. Samoilova, Ph.D.
From journal:
Far Eastern Affairs, No. 4, 2013

"The monograph under review stands out among many works written on the subject due to its original approach to the problem, volume, and quality of the material used. […] One should note compositional precision, detailed description of the subject of investigation, and a high analytical level of presenting material."

by Hansley A. Juliano, Ateneo de Manila University
From journal:
LSE Review of Books, 26-8-2013

"More than a nuanced account of the Fukushima triple disaster, the book will also serve as an exemplary model for students of public policy on how local and national developments cannot be divorced from the demands of transnational relationships."

"More than a nuanced account of the Fukushima triple disaster, the book will also serve as an exemplary model for students of public policy on how local and national developments cannot be divorced from the demands of transnational relationships."

by Ian de Stains
From journal:
Acumen, magazine of the British Chamber of Commerce in Japan

"Perhaps it is too early to really understand the long-term effects [of the triple disaster], but it is surely time to consider such things as energy policy, agricultural implications and food safety, aside from the economic impact.

"Perhaps it is too early to really understand the long-term effects [of the triple disaster], but it is surely time to consider such things as energy policy, agricultural implications and food safety, aside from the economic impact.

Here is a book that does just that. It is academic in its approach but is no less readable because of this. Indeed, the way it looks at the impact that the disaster had on Japanese politics on a broader level is very entertaining.

[The study] highlights important considerations that Japan must address."

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